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2 min read

    2 min read

    Harry here.  Today, RSG senior contributor Christian Perea shares an infographic around the hidden costs of driving for rideshare services like Uber and Lyft. We partnered with QuickBooks Self-Employed to make this infographic to encourage financial wellness amongst drivers. Personally, we’ve seen a lot of drivers over the last few years who ignore a lot of these hidden costs. 

    It’s easy for rideshare drivers to focus on the income they make every day but in this line of work, there are a lot of hidden costs when you drive for services like Uber or Lyft. And if drivers don’t pay attention to the burdens of being self-employed, they could be in for a steep (and expensive) learning curve.

    The extra responsibilities of being an independent contractor aren’t advertised when signing up to haul people around in your Prius. Check some of them out below;

    infographic-hidden-costs-of-uber

    Sources

    Car Costs and Mileage Estimates: How Much Does It Really Cost To Be A Rideshare Driver?

    Tax Estimates: Taxformcalculator.com

    Healthcare Costs: Covered California

    Uncover Your Hidden Costs

    We couldn’t cover everything in this infographic but it’s important that you have an accurate picture of what’s going on with your finances if you plan on making it in this business long term. Even if companies aren’t upfront about the hidden costs of driving, they are still very real. Drivers who refuse to learn will be “taught” when these costs catch-up to them and either force them into more debt or to stop driving altogether.

    There are lots of drivers who have taken the right steps to tracking their income AND expenses and are able to make it work though. So if you want to keep all of your rideshare numbers in one place, you can use our link to get a free 30 day trial of QuickBooks Self-Employed.

    Drivers, what have you found as far as hidden costs when it comes to driving?

    -Christian @ RSG

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    Christian Perea

    Christian Perea

    In 2014, Christian left his job at a mental health center to drive full time for Lyft and Uber. Since then, he has driven for mostly Lyft with a little bit of Sidecar and Postmates thrown in for experimentation and Uber when he doesn't feel like talking to people. He likes to talk about Politics and Economics over a good beer to whoever will listen to him.